Luma Simms

Fellow

Luma Simms, a Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, studies the life and thought of immigrants. As a humanist writer, she publishes on a broad range of topics, with a focus on the human (individual and communal), ethical, religious, and philosophical dimensions of immigration. She is particularly concerned with the crisis of rootlessness, identity, and dehumanization.

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Luma Simms, a Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, studies the life and thought of immigrants. As a humanist writer, she publishes on a broad range of topics, with a focus on the human (individual and communal), ethical, religious, and philosophical dimensions of immigration. She is particularly concerned with the crisis of rootlessness, identity, and dehumanization.

Mrs. Simms’s essays, articles, and book reviews have appeared in a variety of publications including National AffairsThe Wall Street JournalThe Point magazine, Public DiscourseLaw and Liberty, the Institute for Family Studies, and others. She has been interviewed on Arabic television and American and Canadian radio on topics such as religious freedom in the Middle East, Congress and DACA, immigration and the Middle East, divorce, parenting, and elder care in Eastern cultures. Before joining EPPC, Mrs. Simms was an Associate Fellow at The Philos Project where her research and writing focused on a Christian presence in the Middle East, anti-Semitism, and immigrant life and thought.

Some of Mrs. Simms’s notable essays include Identity and Assimilation at National AffairsImmigration and the Desire for Rootedness at Public DiscourseI Am My Enemy: A Naturalized American Finds Herself at War with Her Homeland at Plough Magazine; and Thinking Is Self-Emptying at The Point magazine.

Her background includes a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. She studied law at Chapman University School of Law before leaving to become an at-home mom. Mrs. Simms was born in Baghdad, Iraq; her parents and ancestors are from Mosul, and she speaks Arabic with a Moslawi dialect.

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What Middle Eastern Christians Want

Luma Simms

Maybe Western people are weary of reports on Middle Eastern Christians. But Janine di Giovanni’s The Vanishing is unique because di Giovanni is not seeking a solution, and indeed knows there may not be one.

Articles

First Things / November 3, 2021

Responding to Persecution

Luma Simms

Where Western Christians would stand and fight, Eastern Christians have learned to endure – or flee.

Articles

Plough / October 11, 2021

Refugees Have the Right to Stay in Their Homelands, Too. How Can We Make It…

Luma Simms

Many people are in desperate situations but do not want to leave their countries. We need to find ways to help them.

Articles

America Magazine / May 26, 2021

A Spiritual Clash

Luma Simms

If there is a clash of civilizations, it is not between the Judeo-Christian West and Islam, as Huntington and others have often seen it.

Articles

Law and Liberty / May 19, 2021

The Heart of Progress

Luma Simms

Progress can humanize and dehumanize; our generation in the midst of a dehumanized world has one task: to seek the progress that humanizes.

Articles

The University Bookman / March 28, 2021

Dining Tables as Battering Rams

Luma Simms

The practice of hospitality can be a salve for the fear, loneliness, isolation, selfishness, and obsession with material gain that drives people away from each other and into themselves.

Articles

Philos Project / March 17, 2021

Pope Francis’s Visit to Iraq Answers the Prayers of the Christians Who Refuse to Flee…

Luma Simms

Pope Francis, who has not stopped seeking those driven to the margins of society since the day he became the occupant of St. Peter’s Chair, understands the existential peril of Christians in the Middle East and in Iraq especially.

Articles

America Magazine / March 4, 2021

INTERVIEW: The Complicated Journey of Becoming an American

Luma Simms

Luma Simms, a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, describes learning how to describe her identity, what the American identity should include, and how she synthesizes each day her American self and her Iraqi self.

Articles

The Pursuit of Home

Luma Simms

When it comes to immigration, the fundamental question is: how can we help people find a home? The answer is not no borders, but humane ones.

Articles

Law and Liberty / December 30, 2020

Thinking Is Self-Emptying

Luma Simms

Wounds can be a gift to the world, if they can help other people to know themselves.

Articles

The Point / November 30, 2020

The Secret Desire for Barrenness

Luma Simms

Barrenness was considered a curse for most of human history. Even after Christ, and the birth of his church, when fruitfulness transcended the fertile womb, it has been understood as a matter of pain, of something not as it should be. Yet today, barrenness is a condition that is often deliberately chosen, through the use of contraception.

Articles

Breaking Ground / October 9, 2020

What Does Conservatism Mean After The Iraq War?

Luma Simms

An Iraqi-American reflects on the impact of the war in Iraq on Christians in the country and conservatism in America.

Articles

The American Conservative / May 23, 2020