James Bowman

Resident Scholar

Mr. Bowman is well known for his writing on honor, including his book, Honor: A History and “Whatever Happened to Honor,” originally delivered as one of the prestigious Bradley Lectures at the American Enterprise Institute in 2002, and republished (under the title “The Lost Sense of Honor”) in The Public Interest.

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James Bowman is a Resident Scholar at the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

Mr. Bowman is well known for his writing on honor, including his book, Honor: A History and “Whatever Happened to Honor,” originally delivered as one of the prestigious Bradley Lectures at the American Enterprise Institute in 2002, and republished (under the title “The Lost Sense of Honor”) in The Public Interest.

Among the other publications to which he has contributed are Harper’sThe Public InterestThe Washington PostThe Wall Street JournalThe Daily and Sunday Telegraph of London, The Weekly Standard and National Review.

He has worked as a freelance journalist, serving as American editor of the Times Literary Supplement of London from 1991 to 2002, as movie critic of The American Spectator since 1990 and as media critic of The New Criterion since 1993. He has also been a weekly movie reviewer for The New York Sun since the newspaper’s re-foundation in 2002.

Mr. Bowman received B.A. degrees from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania and the University of Cambridge in England, where he also did graduate study and received an M.A. in 1979.

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World-Shaking Events

James Bowman

It took Protestant Christianity hundreds of years to create and inculcate in ordinary people the idea of the kind of middle-class respectability and decency that Bertie Wooster was always at odds with.

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The New Criterion / April 28, 2022

Real Science

James Bowman

Scientists turned politicians automatically become politicians first, scientists after.

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The New Criterion / March 15, 2022

Vulgar Chants

James Bowman

The media’s unofficial commissars of the Left have to keep the pressure up on behalf of ideological conformity in order to hold the “woke” coalition together—no matter how disconnected from reality they may be.

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Volte-face

James Bowman

Democrats and the media continually urge Americans to get ourselves onto “the right side of history” — which, paradoxically, also means leaving history itself behind us in our inevitable progress towards the progressively promised land. The right side of history turns out to be the one that’s turned away from it.

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Boom and Gloom

James Bowman

The mess the Boomers made will long be with us.

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Jane Austen on Film

James Bowman

In a lecture hosted by the Center for Constructive Alternatives at Hillsdale College, EPPC Resident Scholar James Bowman surveys film adaptations of the works of Jane Austen.

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Hillsdale College / April 15, 2021

Experts in Spate

James Bowman

The coronavirus, together with the measures chosen to deal with it, has been a disaster for pretty much everybody else, but it has been a godsend to the American media and their long-running anti-Trump “narrative.”

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Polite Fictions

James Bowman

The very existence of polite fictions — such as the fiction that impeachment had arisen out of the disinterested concern of public-spirited Democrats to preserve constitutional norms and not as a squalid partisan affair — comes about because we are aware of the absurdity of regarding them as the firmly established truths they pretend to be.

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Ripley’s Believe It or Else

James Bowman

The extremely low opinion, so the pollsters tell us, which Americans hold of the media could never bode well for an institution founded on the extremely high opinion the media hold of themselves.

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Uncivil Service

James Bowman

This year’s election looks to be a referendum on which of two narratives is believed by “the American people,” to whom both sides appeal: that of the New York Times or that of President Trump.

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Just “Politics”

James Bowman

With the departure of seriousness and responsibility from the political culture, what Freud called “the narcissism of small differences” took over, and the rancorousness and hatred which are now the salient features of our political life have been increasing ever since.

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Revolutionism Redux, Part III

James Bowman

If, as now seems possible, the country as a whole learns from the impeachment fiasco to look upon the media-Democrat complex with more skepticism, it may also come to see that the revolutionary whistle-blower is the scandal to democracy to which we should have been paying attention all along.

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