Carter Snead

Fellow

Carter Snead, a Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, is an internationally recognized expert in the field of law and bioethics. His specific areas of expertise include stem-cell research, human cloning, assisted reproduction, neuroscience, abortion, end-of-life matters, and research involving human subject.

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Carter Snead, a Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, is an internationally recognized expert in the field of law and bioethics. His specific areas of expertise include stem-cell research, human cloning, assisted reproduction, neuroscience, abortion, end-of-life matters, and research involving human subject.

Professor Carter Snead joined the faculty of Notre Dame Law School in 2005. His principal area of research is Public Bioethics—the governance of science, medicine, and biotechnology in the name of ethical goods. His scholarly works have explored issues relating to neuroethics, enhancement, stem cell research, abortion, and end-of-life decision making. His commentary and analysis has appeared in such publications and outlets as The New York Times MagazineThe Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, The Toronto Globe and Mail, National Public Radio, and The Glen Beck Program (Fox News Channel).

In addition to his scholarship and teaching, Professor Snead has provided advice on the legal and public policy dimensions of bioethical questions to officials in all three branches of the U.S. government, and in several intergovernmental fora. Prior to joining the law faculty at Notre Dame, Professor Snead served as General Counsel to The President’s Council on Bioethics (Chaired by Dr. Leon R. Kass), where he was the primary drafter of the 2004 report, “Reproduction and Responsibility: The Regulation of New Biotechnologies.” In 2006, he testified in the U.S. House of Representatives on regulatory questions concerning RU-486 (the abortion pill). He was recently appointed by the Director-General of UNESCO to a four-year term on the International Bioethics Committee (IBC), a 36-member body of independent experts that advises member states on bioethics, law, and public policy. The IBC is the only bioethics commission in the world with a global mandate.

Professor Snead received his J.D., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University (where he was elected to the Order of the Coif), and his B.A. from St. John’s College (Annapolis, MD). He clerked for the Hon. Paul J. Kelly, Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.

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Inhuman Nature

Carter Snead

The lawless artifice of American abortion jurisprudence is built on a conception of human identity and flourishing that is false, dangerous, and in no way required by the Constitution.

Articles

The Case for Overturning Roe

Carter Snead

The story of American abortion jurisprudence is a tortured narrative of failed attempts to rationalize the invention of a near-absolute right to abortion that undermines the ability of Americans to govern themselves in some crucial domains of life.

Articles

A Time for Courage on the Supreme Court

Carter Snead

The justices should emulate the courage of their predecessors in Brown v. Board of Education, restore the Court to its proper role as faithful interpreter of the Constitution and begin to repair the vast damage caused by Roe and Casey.

Articles

Newsweek / May 20, 2021

Could the Fate of Society Depend on How We Think About Bodies?

Carter Snead

In an interview with Angelus, EPPC Fellow Carter Snead discusses his new book, What It Means to be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics, and calls for a new “anthropology” and better laws that would lead to greater compassion for the weak and greater respect for the sanctity and dignity of human life.

Articles

Angelus / February 9, 2021

The Way Forward After June Medical

Carter Snead

Now is the time to get back on our feet and return to the work of building a civilization of love, radical hospitality, and legal protection for unborn children and their mothers.

Articles

First Things / July 4, 2020

The Supreme Court Should Protect Unborn Children with Down Syndrome

Carter Snead

Regardless of our nation’s polarized views on the policy and politics of abortion, it is clear that our Constitution does not include a right to abort children merely because of disfavored characteristics.

Articles

Public Discourse / January 2, 2019

The Alfie Evans Case Is Straight Out of a Dystopia

Carter Snead

What began with a hospital’s deadly policy against a child with apparently permanent disabilities ended with a shocking totalitarian intervention by the state, annihilating his parents’ rights in order to ensure Alfie Evans’s demise.

Articles

CNN / May 2, 2018

Why the Pope is Fighting for Charlie Gard

Carter Snead

Once again, Pope Francis is offering a powerful, profound and much-needed lesson to the entire world about how to love unconditionally our brothers and sisters on the peripheries and the grave perils of what he calls a “throwaway culture” that casts aside the weak and defenseless.

Articles

CNN / July 14, 2017

For SCOTUS, a New Era of Judicial Interference

Carter Snead

The Supreme Court’s decision in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt marks a dramatic escalation in the controversial jurisprudence of abortion.

Articles

CNN.com / June 28, 2016

It’s Time to Defund Planned Parenthood

Carter Snead

No amount of attacking the messenger or hair-splitting legal argument can change the fact that Planned Parenthood’s own medical directors have unwittingly offered rare and much-needed clarity about the nature of the business that Planned Parenthood has chosen, and shared (if inadvertently) the truth about precisely whose lives are destroyed as a result.

Articles

Fox News / July 31, 2015

Once More Unto the Breach

Carter Snead

Consistent with its ruling in favor of the federal partial-birth abortion law, the Supreme Court should rule that an Oklahoma law that prohibits the non-FDA-approved use of abortion-inducing drugs is valid.

Articles

SCOTUS Blog / September 16, 2013

The Constitutionality of Protecting Unborn Babies at 20 Weeks

Carter Snead

State legislation that would generally prohibit abortion of unborn babies who are capable of experiencing pain is constitutionally permissible.

Articles

Public Discourse / July 9, 2013