HHS Accountability Project

EPPC’s HHS Accountability Project is dedicated to monitoring the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and holding it accountable to its mission: furthering the health and well-being of all Americans. HHS is the largest federal agency by budget, and its programs and activities directly touch more lives than any other government bureaucracy. But the proper pursuit of its mission depends on an authentic understanding of the human person and a sound understanding of the legal protections to which Americans are entitled. The HHS Accountability Project’s goals include:

  • Ensuring human beings are recognized as worthy of protection from conception until natural death regardless of disability, age, or circumstances of birth.
  • Ensuring abortion and assisted suicide are never accepted or recognized as health care.
  • Preventing ideology from distorting science on questions of human identity and human flourishing.
  • Respecting conscience and religious freedom of health and human services providers and beneficiaries alike.

EPPC Senior Fellow Roger Severino directs the HHS Accountability Project. Mr. Severino is a national authority on civil rights, conscience and religious freedom, the administrative state, and information privacy, particularly as applied to health-care law and policy.

Before joining EPPC, Mr. Severino was the Director of the Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where he led a team of over 250 staff enforcing our nation’s civil rights, conscience and religious freedom, and health information privacy laws. He served from 2017 to 2020 and was the longest serving OCR Director in the past three decades.

EPPC Fellow David Gortler and EPPC Policy Analyst Rachel N. Morrison also serve in the HHS Accountability Project.

Program Publications

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How Biden’s COVID-Testing Mandate Violates Civil Rights

Roger Severino

Yesterday President Biden announced that all federal workers who do not get vaccinated for COVID-19 will face a series of burdens and intrusions designed to raise the costs of not submitting to the shot(s). This is a threat to civil liberties that violates the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Articles

National Review Online / July 31, 2021

EPPC Scholar Comment Opposing Proposed HHS Insurance Regulations

Rachel N. Morrison

EPPC Policy Analyst Rachel N. Morrison submitted a public comment to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services objecting to a proposed rule related to separate payments for abortion services and other insurance regulations.

Articles

Publications / July 29, 2021

Unforgivable Hypocrisy From FDA’s Career CDER Leadership

David Gortler

The same career FDA bureaucrat who loudly crowed about “following the science” to discredit President Trump has approved a failed Alzheimer’s drug.

Articles

Forbes / July 19, 2021

Separate Payments for Abortion Services and Other Changes in HHS’s Proposed Insurance Regulations

Rachel N. Morrison

A new rule proposed by HHS would, among other changes, reverse Trump-era insurance regulations requiring separate billing and collection of payments for certain abortion services.

Articles

Revisiting Harris Funeral Homes’ Compelling Government Interest Analysis After Fulton

Rachel N. Morrison

United States Supreme Court exterior

After Fulton, the Sixth Circuit’s compelling interest analysis in Harris Funeral Homes cannot stand. Courts cannot credit the alleged compelling government interest of non-discrimination by ignoring the constitutional guarantee of free exercise.

Articles

National Review Online / July 8, 2021

Why Unanimity Was So Important in the Fulton Case

Roger Severino

With its 9-0 ruling in favor of the Fulton plaintiffs, the Supreme Court is saying people with sincere faith-informed understandings of social issues that cut against the grain of secularist thought aren’t to be treated as bigots, and government needs to back off.

Articles

National Review Online / June 18, 2021

Breaking: EEOC Chairwoman Unilaterally Issues Gender Guidelines

Roger Severino

Charlotte Burrows, chairwoman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), posted a guidance document purporting to apply Bostock v. Clayton County, which redefined Title VII’s prohibitions on discrimination “because of sex” to include sexual orientation and transgender status in certain contexts.

Articles

National Review Online / June 15, 2021