George Weigel

Distinguished Senior Fellow and William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies

George Weigel, Distinguished Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, is a Catholic theologian and one of America’s leading public intellectuals. He holds EPPC’s William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies.

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George Weigel, Distinguished Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, is a Catholic theologian and one of America’s leading public intellectuals. He holds EPPC’s William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies.

From 1989 through June 1996, Mr. Weigel was president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he led a wide-ranging, ecumenical and inter-religious program of research and publication on foreign and domestic policy issues.

Mr. Weigel is perhaps best known for his widely translated and internationally acclaimed two-volume biography of Pope St. John Paul II: the New York Times bestseller, Witness to Hope (1999), and its sequel, The End and the Beginning (2010). In 2017, Weigel published a memoir of the experiences that led to his work as a papal biographer: Lessons in Hope — My Unexpected Life with St. John Paul II.

George Weigel is the author or editor of more than thirty other books, many of which have been translated into other languages. Among the most recent are The Cube and the Cathedral: Europe, America, and Politics Without God (2005); Evangelical Catholicism: Deep Reform in the 21st-Century Church (2013); Roman Pilgrimage: The Station Churches (2013); Letters to a Young Catholic (2015); The Fragility of Order: Catholic Reflections on Turbulent Times (2018); The Next Pope: The Office of Peter and a Church in Mission (2020); and Not Forgotten: Elegies for, and Reminiscences of, a Diverse Cast of Characters, Most of Them Admirable (2021). His essays, op-ed columns, and reviews appear regularly in major opinion journals and newspapers across the United States. A frequent guest on television and radio, he is also Senior Vatican Analyst for NBC News. His weekly column, “The Catholic Difference,” is syndicated to eighty-five newspapers and magazines in seven countries.

Mr. Weigel received a B.A. from St. Mary’s Seminary and University in Baltimore and an M.A. from the University of St. Michael’s College, Toronto. He is the recipient of nineteen honorary doctorates in fields including divinity, philosophy, law, and social science, and has been awarded the Papal Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice, Poland’s Gloria Artis Gold Medal, and Lithuania’s Diplomacy Star.

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The Bishops, Donatism, and President Biden

George Weigel

By actively facilitating a grave moral evil, President Biden and others have put themselves in a defective state of communion with the Church, such that their own integrity requires that they not present themselves for holy communion.

Articles

Syndicated Column / July 28, 2021

Liberal Authoritarianism and the Traditional Latin Mass

George Weigel

The recent apostolic letter Traditionis Custodes [Custodians of the Tradition] was theologically incoherent, pastorally divisive, unnecessary, cruel—and a sorry example of the liberal bullying that has become all too familiar in Rome recently.

Articles

Syndicated Column / July 21, 2021

Pope Francis and the Life Issues

George Weigel

Media distortions are not simply annoying; they can have serious public effects. It’s worth remembering the quite robust terms in which Pope Francis has condemned abortion.

Articles

Syndicated Column / July 14, 2021

The 2021 Summer Reading List

George Weigel

Liberation from lockdowns and quarantines ought not be liberation from serious reading, opportunities for which being one of the few boons of the recent past. Here are some suggestions for summer enrichment.

Articles

The DeLauro Democrats and the Bishops

George Weigel

The days are past when the American hierarchy could be cowed by the political and journalistic principalities and powers and the “progressive” Catholic media.

Articles

Cardinal Pell at Eighty

George Weigel

Cardinal George Pell was not built for quiescence. His voice will be heard. And it will be heard where it counts.

Articles

Syndicated Column / June 16, 2021

Thirty Years of Poland

George Weigel

Three decades of work and conversation in Poland have shaped me in ways I would not have thought possible thirty years ago. For that, I am deeply grateful to a nation that might yet become a model for twenty-first-century democracy, if it took the social doctrine of its greatest son seriously.

Articles

Syndicated Column / June 9, 2021

The Oldest Cathedral and the Newest Challenge

George Weigel

President Biden, Speaker Pelosi, and Catholic public officials of both parties are defining Catholicism according to the woke spirit of the age. John Carroll’s episcopal heirs should call them out on that.

Articles

Syndicated Column / June 2, 2021

The First U.S. Cathedral Turns 200

George Weigel

Two hundred years after it was built, the Baltimore Basilica is more than a masterpiece of Federal-style architecture. It is the center of an innovative urban mission in one of America’s most troubled cities, and it is an unparalleled historical site: the place where more U.S. Catholic history was made than at any other.

Articles

The Wall Street Journal / May 28, 2021

The Healer: Paul McHugh at 90

George Weigel

Few scientists have made greater contributions to unraveling the mysteries of our complex inner lives than Paul McHugh; few men of such eminence have suffered such calumnies from critics who haven’t one-fifth of his intellectual wattage or one-tenth of his moral courage.

Articles

Syndicated Column / May 26, 2021

A Most Unfortunate Roman Intervention

George Weigel

The strategy that Cardinal Luis Ladaria urges in his letter to U.S. Bishops replicates key elements in the McCarrick approach to pro-abortion American politicians. The sluggish, tepid approach to a crisis is badly misconceived.

Articles

Syndicated Column / May 19, 2021

Vatican II on Catholics in Public Life

George Weigel

Coherently Catholic public officials, whose faith illuminates the truths that make for human flourishing and who integrate those truths into their political lives, are the Catholics who best reflect the Church’s intention to “establish and consolidate the human community according to the law of God.”

Articles

Syndicated Column / May 12, 2021