Erika Bachiochi

Fellow

EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi is a legal scholar specializing in Equal Protection jurisprudence, feminist legal theory, Catholic social teaching, and sexual ethics. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Abigail Adams Institute in Cambridge, MA, where she founded and directs the Wollstonecraft Project. Her newest book, The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision, was published by Notre Dame University Press in 2021.

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EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi is a legal scholar specializing in Equal Protection jurisprudence, feminist legal theory, Catholic social teaching, and sexual ethics. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Abigail Adams Institute in Cambridge, MA, where she founded and directs the Wollstonecraft Project. Her newest book, The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision, is forthcoming from Notre Dame University Press in 2021.

Ms. Bachiochi’s essays have appeared in publications such as the Harvard Journal of Law and Public PolicyChristian Bioethics (Oxford University), The AtlanticFirst Things, CNN.com, National Review OnlineNational AffairsClaremont Review of Books, SCOTUSblog, and Public Discourse. Particularly noteworthy are law review articles, “Embodied Equality: Debunking Equality Protection Arguments for Abortion Rights” (2011) and “A Putative Right in Search of a Constitutional Justification: Understanding Planned Parenthood v Casey’s Equality Rationale and How It Undermines Women’s Equality” (2017). She is the editor of two books, Women, Sex & the Church: A Case for Catholic Teaching (Pauline Books & Media, 2010) and The Cost of “Choice”: Women Evaluate the Impact of Abortion (Encounter Books, 2004).

Ms. Bachiochi is an occasional contributor to Mirror of Justice and serves on the Advisory Boards of the Common Good Project, the Catholic Women’s Forum, and the Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum. She is a co-founder of St. Benedict Classical Academy in Natick, Massachusetts where she served as President of the Board from 2013-2015. She and her husband live outside of Boston and are the happy parents of seven children.

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Early Claims for Joint Property

Erika Bachiochi

In this excerpt adapted from her book The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision, EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi writes about women’s early joint property rights claims and the value of the work of the home, tracing Mary Wollstonecraft’s argument that such work affords the character development men, women, and children need for true success in the public sphere, which provides a renewed rationale for family policy today.

Articles

Abortion Rights and Women’s Equal Citizenship

Erika Bachiochi

The time has come instead to discard the male-normative theories of equality on which the putative right to abortion is constructed today. Instead, let’s make room, as earlier generations of women’s rights advocates did, for vulnerable and dependent children, and for the women—and men—responsible for their care.

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Newsweek / September 1, 2021

Women, Families, and the Ends of Freedom

Erika Bachiochi

Women and men ought to enjoy political rights by virtue of their common human nature, but such rights are not individualistic means for self-actualization.

Articles

Law and Liberty / August 17, 2021

INTERVIEW: Erika Bachiochi Says Abortion Is Anathema to Authentic Feminism, Deviation From Women’s Movement’s Origins

Erika Bachiochi

In an interview with Fox News, EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi discusses her call to reimagine ‘feminism anew: a feminism in search of human excellence.’

Fox News / August 13, 2021

INTERVIEW: What Would Founding Feminist Say to Women’s Movement Today?

Erika Bachiochi

EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi talks with Crux about her new book, The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision.

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Crux / July 22, 2021

Reclaiming a Lost Vision of the Rights of Women

Erika Bachiochi

The philosophical and political principle of equal citizenship for women has morphed in the last half century into something that nearly contradicts its original moral vision, a vision first fully articulated by English philosopher Mary Wollstonecraft in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman more than two centuries ago.

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Church Life Journal / July 19, 2021

Reclaiming Feminism from the Logic of the Market

Erika Bachiochi

All human beings are created with equal dignity and worth. But such dignity finds its true nobility when, as earlier women’s rights advocates well understood, each of us is encouraged and empowered by our families and our communities to seek moral excellence in all we do.

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Newsweek / July 15, 2021

To Find Your Life’s Mission, Follow Your Questions

Erika Bachiochi

We find our life’s mission not by seeking after some “castle in the air,” but by fulfilling the very concrete duty of each moment, one moment at a time.

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Public Discourse / June 9, 2021

Toward a Family Wage (Subsidy)

Erika Bachiochi

A direct cash benefit spreads the overwhelming costs of raising the next generation to the community, allowing parents more freedom from market work to give their children the time and attention they need to grow into happy and productive adults.

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American Compass / February 26, 2021

The Equality Act’s Implications for Abortion Would Be Devastating for Pregnant Women in the Workplace

Erika Bachiochi

The Equality Act’s sponsors seem to be trying to retool the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, transforming it from a law that is explicitly neutral as to abortion into a mechanism that may well be construed to require health care providers to perform abortions and states to fund them.

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America Magazine / February 25, 2021

The Merits of Romney’s Pro-Family Policy

Erika Bachiochi

Sen. Mitt Romney’s “Family Security Act” has many merits as a response to the bleak trends highlighted by the pandemic. More important still, it would serve as an overdue corrective to liberalism’s devastating effects on the family.

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First Things / February 11, 2021

The Contested Meaning of Women’s Equality

Erika Bachiochi

However much we might like our daughters and sons to see their fundamental equality emblazoned in the text of the Constitution, strict equality will not give mothers and fathers the support they need. A more intentional and robust family policy, on the other hand, just might.

Articles