Erika Bachiochi

Fellow

EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi is a legal scholar specializing in Equal Protection jurisprudence, feminist legal theory, Catholic social teaching, and sexual ethics. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Abigail Adams Institute in Cambridge, MA, where she founded and directs the Wollstonecraft Project. Her newest book, The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision, was published by Notre Dame University Press in 2021.

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EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi is a legal scholar specializing in Equal Protection jurisprudence, feminist legal theory, Catholic social teaching, and sexual ethics. A 2018 visiting scholar at Harvard Law School, she is also a Senior Fellow at the Abigail Adams Institute in Cambridge, MA, where she founded and directs the Wollstonecraft Project. Her newest book, The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision, was published by Notre Dame University Press in 2021, and was named a finalist for the Intercollegiate Studies Institute’s 2022 Conservative Book of the Year award.

Ms. Bachiochi’s essays have appeared in publications such as the Harvard Journal of Law and Public PolicyChristian Bioethics (Oxford University), The New York Times, The AtlanticFirst Things, CNN.com, National Review OnlineNational AffairsClaremont Review of Books, SCOTUSblog, and Public Discourse. Particularly noteworthy are law review articles, “Embodied Equality: Debunking Equality Protection Arguments for Abortion Rights” (2011) and “A Putative Right in Search of a Constitutional Justification: Understanding Planned Parenthood v Casey’s Equality Rationale and How It Undermines Women’s Equality” (2017). She is the editor of two books, Women, Sex & the Church: A Case for Catholic Teaching (Pauline Books & Media, 2010) and The Cost of “Choice”: Women Evaluate the Impact of Abortion (Encounter Books, 2004).

Ms. Bachiochi is an occasional contributor to Mirror of Justice and serves on the Advisory Boards of the Common Good Project, the Catholic Women’s Forum, the Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, St. Thomas More Academy (South Bend), and EthicsFinder. She is a co-founder of St. Benedict Classical Academy in Natick, Massachusetts where she served as President of the Board from 2013-2015.

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Pursuing the Reunification of Home and Work

Erika Bachiochi

As parents have responsibilities to care for, nurture, and educate their children, a just and humane economy and politics ought to help parents carry out those duties of care.

Articles

American Compass / July 17, 2022

What Makes a Fetus a Person?

Erika Bachiochi

Constitutional protection of unborn children as equal “persons” under the law remains the movement’s ultimate — if elusive — goal.

Articles

The New York Times / July 1, 2022

After Roe and Dobbs

Erika Bachiochi

As pro-life advocates and legislators consider how they ought to proceed in the post-Roe era, they should heed the wisdom of the early feminists who, as champions of both women and their dependent children, understood the power – and limits – of the law to effect real change.

Articles

Plough / May 16, 2022

Simone Weil: A Thinker for Our Trying Times

Erika Bachiochi

Weil desired not only to understand the sufferings of the dispossessed but to suffer alongside them.

Articles

Law and Liberty / February 3, 2022

Where Will the Anti-Abortion Feminist Movement Go Post-Roe?

Erika Bachiochi

In Roe’s absence, concerns about women’s economic welfare would have to be addressed as they should: by ending poverty, not unborn lives.

Articles

The New York Times / December 10, 2021

I Couldn’t Vote for Trump, but I’m Grateful for His Supreme Court Picks

Erika Bachiochi

If Roe goes, the pro-life movement can begin where it left off in 1973, working to convince fellow citizens (especially in blue states like mine) that we owe dependent and vulnerable unborn children what every human being is due: hospitality, respect and care.

Articles

The New York Times / December 7, 2021

An Argument for a Revised Feminism, Rooted in a Correct Anthropology

Carl R. Trueman

At the heart of Erika Bachiochi’s The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision is the assertion that human beings are not defined by autonomy but rather by relations of dependency and obligation.

Articles

The Catholic World Report / November 26, 2021

Women Do Not ‘Rely’ on Abortion

Erika Bachiochi

Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey hang by the thin thread of “reliance.” Chip away at Casey’s assertion that women rely on abortion for their participation in economic and social life, and there is not much left of the cases that have distorted constitutional interpretation and held U.S. politics hostage for nearly 50 years.

Articles

The Feminist Revolution Has Stalled. Blame Roe v. Wade.

Erika Bachiochi

If the “gender revolution” has stalled—elevating women in the workplace without a concomitant elevation for the work mothers and fathers do in the home—constitutionalizing the right to abortion shares a good deal of the blame.

Articles

America Magazine / November 1, 2021

Early Claims for Joint Property

Erika Bachiochi

In this excerpt adapted from her book The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision, EPPC Fellow Erika Bachiochi writes about women’s early joint property rights claims and the value of the work of the home, tracing Mary Wollstonecraft’s argument that such work affords the character development men, women, and children need for true success in the public sphere, which provides a renewed rationale for family policy today.

Articles

Abortion Rights and Women’s Equal Citizenship

Erika Bachiochi

The time has come instead to discard the male-normative theories of equality on which the putative right to abortion is constructed today. Instead, let’s make room, as earlier generations of women’s rights advocates did, for vulnerable and dependent children, and for the women—and men—responsible for their care.

Articles

Newsweek / September 1, 2021

Women, Families, and the Ends of Freedom

Erika Bachiochi

Women and men ought to enjoy political rights by virtue of their common human nature, but such rights are not individualistic means for self-actualization.

Articles

Law and Liberty / August 17, 2021