Luma Simms

Fellow

Luma Simms, a Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, studies the life and thought of immigrants. As a humanist writer, she publishes on a broad range of topics, with a focus on the human (individual and communal), ethical, religious, and philosophical dimensions of immigration. She is particularly concerned with the crisis of rootlessness, identity, and dehumanization.

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Luma Simms, a Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, studies the life and thought of immigrants. As a humanist writer, she publishes on a broad range of topics, with a focus on the human (individual and communal), ethical, religious, and philosophical dimensions of immigration. She is particularly concerned with the crisis of rootlessness, identity, and dehumanization.

Mrs. Simms’s essays, articles, and book reviews have appeared in a variety of publications including National AffairsThe Wall Street JournalThe Point magazine, Public DiscourseLaw and Liberty, the Institute for Family Studies, and others. She has been interviewed on Arabic television and American and Canadian radio on topics such as religious freedom in the Middle East, Congress and DACA, immigration and the Middle East, divorce, parenting, and elder care in Eastern cultures. Before joining EPPC, Mrs. Simms was an Associate Fellow at The Philos Project where her research and writing focused on a Christian presence in the Middle East, anti-Semitism, and immigrant life and thought.

Some of Mrs. Simms’s notable essays include Identity and Assimilation at National AffairsImmigration and the Desire for Rootedness at Public DiscourseI Am My Enemy: A Naturalized American Finds Herself at War with Her Homeland at Plough Magazine; and Thinking Is Self-Emptying at The Point magazine.

Her background includes a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. She studied law at Chapman University School of Law before leaving to become an at-home mom. Mrs. Simms was born in Baghdad, Iraq; her parents and ancestors are from Mosul, and she speaks Arabic with a Moslawi dialect.

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People and Their Relationships

Luma Simms

When our conception of relationships and relationship-building is based on a vision of the human person as an atomized choice maker who forms bonds for his or her benefit, we should not wonder why institutions decay. Our institutions are in crisis because we are in an identity crisis.

Articles

Public Discourse / March 12, 2020

The Need For a Humane Immigration Debate

Luma Simms

The immigration restrictionists at the turn of the 20th century were driven by eugenic doctrine, and they built their arguments on racial theories. So what do we do today with this legacy of the immigration restrictionists of old?

Articles

Law and Liberty / March 10, 2020

Persecution, True and False

Luma Simms

The key for Christians—from the beginning—has always been how they respond to trials and tribulations, and the most genuinely Christian responses historically have not been via force or politics but rather acts of care and love of neighbor.

Articles

Law and Liberty / December 23, 2019

If You Don’t Find Your Identity in a Family, You’ll Look For It in the…

Luma Simms

The ascent of identity politics reveals that people are having an identity crisis, and they are having an identity crisis because the sexual revolution resulted in family—and, by extension, individual—breakdown.

Articles

Public Discourse / September 3, 2019

Immigration and the Desire for Rootedness

Luma Simms

National conservatives need to help create an America that knows who she is, one that can give immigrants more than just a place to get a job—an America that can draw them in, giving them a sense of belonging.

Articles

Public Discourse / July 22, 2019

Conservative Women and the Intra-Conservatism Debate

Luma Simms

The men that are the standard-bearers of conservatism need to make a greater effort to cultivate conservative women’s voices in the public square.

Articles

Public Discourse / June 9, 2019

Iran’s Revolution Reconsidered

Luma Simms

Iran and the rest of the Middle Eastern world do not need any more revolutions or Western foreign policy interventions. They need a revolution of conscience: the moral power of human dignity.

Articles

Law and Liberty / February 20, 2019

Policy Change Alone Can Never Fix Our Immigration Problems

Luma Simms

Melting Pot or Civil War? offers what we might call economic solutions to what is fundamentally a human and cultural problem.

Articles

Law and Liberty / November 20, 2018

Immigrant Assimilation in the United States: Reihan Salam’s Melting Pot or Civil War?

Luma Simms

Our immigration crisis needs more than just policy. When making policy changes that relate to immigration, we need to consider the human cost.

Articles

Public Discourse / November 14, 2018

The Soul’s Need for Rootedness

Luma Simms

Yoram Hazony’s The Virtue of Nationalism is a much-needed pushback against modern globalists and imperialists who would erase human distinctions and offers a much-needed impetus to rethink current political paradigms.

Articles

Law and Liberty / October 9, 2018

Iraqi Refugees Deserve Special Treatment

Luma Simms

When it comes to Iraq in particular—and not only those Iraqis who directly helped the American military effort—the U.S. has distinct moral obligations.

Articles

The Wall Street Journal / September 23, 2018

Secular Nationalism, Islamism, and Making the Arab World

Luma Simms

What have we learned from our failed Middle Eastern endeavors?

Articles

Law and Liberty / September 17, 2018