Peter Wehner

Senior Fellow

Peter Wehner is a Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. He is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times and a contributing editor for The Atlantic magazine. Mr. Wehner has written for numerous other publications—including Time magazine, the Wall Street JournalWashington PostFinancial TimesThe Weekly StandardNational ReviewCommentaryNational Affairs, and Christianity Today—and has appeared frequently as a commentator on MSNBC, CNN, Fox News, CBS, PBS, and C-SPAN television. He was also the Pamela and Jack Egan Visiting Professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy and the School of Arts and Sciences at Duke University in 2019–2020.

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Peter Wehner is a Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. He is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times and a contributing editor for The Atlantic magazine. Mr. Wehner has written for numerous other publications—including Time magazine, the Wall Street JournalWashington PostFinancial TimesThe Weekly StandardNational ReviewCommentaryNational Affairs, and Christianity Today—and has appeared frequently as a commentator on MSNBC, CNN, Fox News, CBS, PBS, and C-SPAN television. He was also the Pamela and Jack Egan Visiting Professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy and the School of Arts and Sciences at Duke University in 2019–2020.

Mr. Wehner served in the Reagan and George H.W. Bush Administrations prior to becoming deputy director of speechwriting for President George W. Bush. In 2002, he was asked to head the Office of Strategic Initiatives, where he generated policy ideas, reached out to public intellectuals, published op-eds and essays, and provided counsel on a range of domestic and international issues. He has also served as an adviser to several presidential campaigns.

Mr. Wehner’s book The Death of Politics: How to Heal Our Frayed Republic After Trump (HarperCollins) was published in June 2019. He is also author of City of Man: Religion and Politics in a New Era (co-authored with Michael J. Gerson), Wealth and Justice: The Morality of Democratic Capitalism (co-authored with Arthur C. Brooks), and co-editor of books on foreign policy (The Latin American Policies of U.S. Allies) and national security (Promise or Peril: The Strategic Defense Initiative).

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The Moral Inversion of the Republican Party

Peter Wehner

Republicans are at risk of being devoured by the forces they placed in control.

Articles

The Atlantic / February 4, 2021

The End of Trump Can Be the Beginning of America

Peter Wehner

It made sense that once President Trump left the White House, powerful emotions would be unleashed.

Articles

The New York Times / January 22, 2021

Christians as a Cultural Minority (Again)

Peter Wehner

The greatest and most powerful Christian distinctive is not the exercise of power; it is the offer of grace.

Articles

The Washington Institute / January 14, 2021

Many Republicans Own This Insurrection

Peter Wehner

Responsibility for the storming of the Capitol extends well beyond President Trump.

Articles

The Atlantic / January 7, 2021

Some Republicans Have Finally Found a Line They Won’t Cross

Peter Wehner

The GOP needs leaders who will distance their party from the wreckage and the ruin the president has brought.

Articles

The Atlantic / January 4, 2021

Cowards are Destroying the GOP

Peter Wehner

Those who have hoped that Republican leaders would begin to break free from Donald Trump once he lost the election have not understood the nature of the change that has come over the party’s base.

Articles

The Atlantic / December 31, 2020

The Forgotten Radicalism of Jesus Christ

Peter Wehner

First-century Christians weren’t prepared for what a truly radical and radically inclusive figure Jesus was, and neither are today’s Christians. We want to tame and domesticate who he was, but Jesus’ life and ministry don’t really allow for it.

Articles

The New York Times / December 24, 2020

Trump Is Losing His Mind

Peter Wehner

The president is discussing martial law in the Oval Office, as his grip on reality falters.

Articles

The Atlantic / December 20, 2020

Trump’s Most Malicious Legacy

Peter Wehner

The outgoing president leaves behind a tribalistic, distrustful, and sometimes delusional political culture.

Articles

The Atlantic / December 7, 2020

Choose Repair, Not Revenge

Peter Wehner

Because we are a nation so fractured that each side barely comprehends the other, this is a time for magnanimity.

Articles

The Atlantic / November 16, 2020

Trump Lives in a Hall of Mirrors and He’s Got Plenty of Company

Peter Wehner

If Donald Trump loses his re-election bid, there will be a lot of ruin to sort through. But his most damaging and enduring legacy may well turn out to be the promiscuous use of conspiracy theories that have defined both the man and his presidency.

Articles

The New York Times / November 2, 2020

Biden May Be Just the Person America Needs

Peter Wehner

In a different time, with a different president, Joe Biden would not stand out. But President Trump’s particular maladies have created a moment in which Biden’s greatest strengths as a person are most needed by the nation.

Articles

The Atlantic / November 2, 2020

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