Bruce Cole

CBS News: The Fight to Build a President Eisenhower Memorial

EPPC Senior Fellow Bruce Cole appeared on CBS This Morning to discuss the controversial design for a planned memorial to President Eisenhower in Washington, D.C.

Beach Bums

On “BEACH” at the National Building Museum, the Eisenhower Memorial, and the end of James Billington’s tenure as Librarian of Congress.

New York Survival Story

A new book tells the story of a “near-death experience” that threatened the future not only of the New York Public Library but of its vast collection of books, rare manuscripts, artifacts, and ephemera.

Too Cool in the Capital

The National Portrait Gallery does best when it focuses on high-caliber artists, rather then pandering to its visitors with exhibitions that attempt to be “cool.” Elsewhere in the capital, the Eisenhower Memorial Commission continues to lurch along.

EPPC Briefly: Yuval Levin on the Roots of a Reforming Conservatism

Mary Rice Hasson on complementarity in the church; George Weigel on Cardinal Francis George’s legacy; Bruce Cole on civics education; Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry on a surprising revolution in France; and much more.

American Amnesia

The release of the U.S. Department of Education’s latest National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for history, civics and geography shows that we are raising another generation of historical and civic amnesiacs.


Gehry’s Middle Finger

The gullible bureaucrats responsible for hiring Frank Gehry for the Eisenhower Memorial put the American taxpayer into the hands of a fashionable architect whose works, quite frankly, are already starting to look clichéd and dated.

A Monumental Shame

The noble idea to build a memorial to Dwight Eisenhower has become a classic Washington boondoggle, an object lesson on how not to build a memorial in that city.

Greatness in Miniature

A concise new biography offers good insight into the character of Dwight D. Eisenhower.

The Imprint of Battle

A Virginia Museum of Fine Arts exhibition of high-quality etchings, engravings, lithographs and dry points, all accompanied by helpful explanatory labels, chronicle World War I from the British Isles to the deserts of the Near East.