Stephen White Archives - Ethics & Public Policy Center

Amy Barrett and the Intolerable

The distinctiveness of Barrett’s faith – and the consternation it causes among the champions of certain secular pieties – is refreshing. It also underscores the indistinctiveness of so many Catholics who hold public office.

Callista Gingrich Suits the Job of Vatican Ambassador. But Can Newt Stay Out of the Spotlight?

Callista Gingrich will have a delicate task. Her indefatigable husband could complicate things.

Interview: How Catholics Can Be Good Citizens and Not Despair

EPPC Fellow Stephen White discusses his new book in an interview with NRO’s Kathryn Jean Lopez.

Good Catholics, Good Citizens

Religion is emphatically a public good, and one indispensable to limited government, as the Founders were constantly pointing out. The Church ought to be free to be herself for her sake, for the sake of the faithful, and for the sake of the common good.

Catholicism’s American Revolution

From annulments to pro-life activism, the American Church is blazing a trail for the rest of the Catholic world.

The Pope’s Climate Change Message is Really About Rethinking What it Means to be Human

What makes the new encyclical truly radical — in the sense of going to the root — is the pope’s reading of the profound human crisis that he sees underlying our modern world.

Strong Medicine: The World Needs to Hear the Message of Laudato Si’

The Pope’s forceful, and in many ways radical, critique of our modern world is not built upon a particular reading of the scientific literature, but upon the Church’s understanding of the gift of creation and the place of man within creation.

A Sign of Contradiction

To read “Laudato Si’” through the anthropologically flimsy lens of today’s policy debates—however important or urgent—is to miss the true foundations upon which Pope Francis grounds his call to defend creation.

A Life in the Public Square

Randy Boyagoda’s biography of Richard John Neuhaus is an authentic and compelling portrait of a man who had as much influence as any in the 20th century on the place of religion in American public life.