philosophy Archives - Ethics & Public Policy Center

Thinking Is Self-Emptying

Wounds can be a gift to the world, if they can help other people to know themselves.

Coronavirus and ‘Vindication of God’

The pandemic raises the old question of theodicy, the core dilemma of faith.

Diderot and the Enlightenment Cult of Reason

A praiseful new intellectual biography of the French philosophe Denis Diderot (1713–1784) offers hope that serious engagement with the past is still possible in the academy.

Interview: Sir Roger Scruton on What It Means to Be a Conservative

Sir Roger Scruton talks to National Review about his latest book and the meaning of conservatism.

Did an Ancient Greek Anticipate Trump?

Heraclitus’ view of the world in constant flux found echoes in Hegel and now in the president.

Pursuing the Truth Requires Modesty about Ourselves

Truth is not subjective. But we should be modest about our grasp of the truth, mindful of our limited understanding and our own tendency to reach conclusions first and find evidence second.

The Uses of Friendships: Moses Mendelssohn

The life of 18th-century German intellectual Moses Mendelssohn does not hold some secret answer to the challenges that confront our age. But he offers a model of taking such challenges seriously, and of keeping in mind the importance not only of toleration and of steadfastness but also of friendship, which can sometimes bridge the two.

America’s Francification: La Fin

America would do well by building a stronger bipartisan commitment to family policy, and by cultivating a renewed appreciation for America’s founding ideals.

If We Are Not Just Animals, What Are We?

There is something in the human condition that suggests the need for special treatment.

Where Do Our Morals Come From?

Today, in academic philosophy, the idea of morality as a feeling has mostly won the day, albeit with moral rationalists fighting a vigorous insurgency.