history Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Ethics & Public Policy Center

Correcting for the Historian’s Middle Eastern Biases

Eugene Rogan’s The Arabs: A History will be of value to readers who wish to understand the Arab world the way Arabs want to be understood. As history it is fabulous, but as analysis, it has a certain bias that I found frustrating as an Arab Christian.

The Chosen People and American Exceptionalism

America made each man the guardian of his neighbor’s strangeness and thereby turned strangers into neighbors without destroying or whitewashing what makes each man strange to another. This was a new solution to one of the oldest, most fundamental political challenges in man’s history and the heart of American exceptionalism.

Grim Harvest: Review of Irving and Brozek’s Way of the Reaper

On the surface, Nicholas Irving’s Way of the Reaper seems to be a typical shoot-‘em-up memoir designed for men vicariously seeking adventure, but the writer’s experience on the battlefield finally sinks into his consciousness, enabling him to break through the studied callousness of the combat soldier and to turn himself into a case study on the role of battle in causing moral injury.

Right Side vs. White Side

As the advent of that earthly paradise has been deferred, and deferred again, and as the honor culture whose destruction was its condition has grown ever more irrecoverable, the urgency with which the institution of the progressive utopia is required and the bitterness towards those seen as standing in its glorious way have grown pari passu.

Ulysses Grant’s America and Ours

In Ron Chernow’s telling, Ulysses Grant became among other things an inquiry into the great American problem: how to reconcile virtue and power.

Fantasia on a Theme

Kurt Andersen’s new book amounts to little more than an elite attempt to justify its author’s perception of the America for which he harbors such contempt.

‘Patriotism’ Has Always Divided Us. National Memory Can Unite Us.

A patriotism of common national memory could be the answer to the riddle of a politics divided over how to be unified. It is not a way to make our differences go away, but rather to allow us better to live with them and so with each other.

America’s Shakespeare

For Americans, Shakespeare has been a figure of particular reverence, yearning, and vexation. He has stood for the time-honored refinements of civilization that Americans, as late starters, have not yet had time to nourish into full flower. But he has also been the paragon whom stout-hearted democrats believe themselves destined to surpass.

Voice of Civilization

Like Herodotus, Thucydides, Montaigne, and Proust, Edward Gibbon (1737–1794) was a one-book wonder.

Gloucester Fisherman, American Veteran, Polish Benefactor

There’s more than a whiff of isolationism in the American air these days. The remarkable, wonderful story of Curtis Dagley and the Poles who remembered him with gratitude seventy years later is a poignant reminder that some still look to the United States as a pillar of stability and decency in a very nasty world.