Germany Archives - Ethics & Public Policy Center

An Agenda for the Catholic Future

EPPC Distinguished Senior Fellow George Weigel was interviewed recently by Oliver Maksan, editor-in-chief of the German newspaper Die Tagespost.

“Wittenberg” in Synodal Slow Motion

It is astonishing that, confronted by unmistakable empirical evidence that liberal Protestantism has collapsed around the world, German Catholic leaders, ordained and lay, seem determined to create a nominally Catholic form of liberal Protestantism through a slow-motion “Wittenberg.”

Auschwitz and “Intrinsic Evil”

The lethal reality of what happened at Auschwitz-Birkenau stands in contradiction to the claim by some Catholic moral theologians—once thought marginalized but now back in business—that there are no “intrinsically evil acts.”

What Kind of “Believers”?

Catholicism is dying in the German-speaking world, not because the gospel has been proclaimed and found incredible or hard, but because it hasn’t been proclaimed with joy, confidence, and zeal.

An Open Letter to Cardinal Reinhard Marx

The German Church is dying, and it will not be revitalized by becoming a simulacrum of moribund liberal Protestantism.

Craving Approval Isn’t Evangelization

Toadying to the talking heads of postmodern intellectual confusion and to the tastemakers of decadent postmodern culture is not the way to be the Church of the New Evangelization, or the “Church permanently in mission” that Pope Francis calls us to be. It’s the way to become a laughingstock, en route to the boneyard of irrelevance.

Learning from the White Rose

There is a lot of talk in the Church these days about “conscience,” and Blessed John Henry Newman is invoked by many prominent personalities in those debates. So it might be useful for all concerned, including Church leaders in the Munich where the White Rose youngsters in 1943 gave their lives for the truth, to ponder Newman’s influence on these contemporary martyrs.

Rethinking “Mission Territory”

What could be more appropriate on the quincentenary of the Reformation than to call German Catholicism to a thoroughgoing Catholic reform?

Now, the Kasper Theory of Democracy?

A distinguished theologian-bishop’s recent comments about Ireland’s “same-sex marriage” vote suggest that he has seriously misunderstood the nature of democracy and the Church’s teaching about just political communities.

The Catholic Church’s German Problem

German Catholicism is in crisis because German Catholics have not embraced the Lord Jesus and his Gospel with passion, conviction and joy, and are seeking their happiness elsewhere.