First Things Archives - Ethics & Public Policy Center

When Amazon Erased My Book

Three years after publication, in the same week that the House of Representatives plans to ram through the Equality Act—a radical transgender bill amending the Civil Rights Act of 1964—Amazon has erased EPPC President Ryan T. Anderson’s book opposing gender ideology from its cyber shelves.

Somebody Needs to Be Dad

The extraordinary fact of Catholic life in the United States is not the few bishops who humiliate us so bitterly, but the many who do the job so well

Hope and Her Daughters

Hope feeds and grows on the experience of love, the will to persist in that love, and the letting go of anger, no matter how vicious or lunatic the times.

The Merits of Romney’s Pro-Family Policy

Sen. Mitt Romney’s “Family Security Act” has many merits as a response to the bleak trends highlighted by the pandemic. More important still, it would serve as an overdue corrective to liberalism’s devastating effects on the family.

Archbishop José Gomez: A Profile in Episcopal Courage

The statement on Inauguration Day by the president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops was a pastor’s invitation to President Biden to open his soul to the fullness of Catholic truth.

Inaugural Reflections on American Renewal

In today’s unprecedented situation, what are the commitments to be re-affirmed by those promoting a religiously-informed public philosophy for the American experiment in ordered liberty?

The Genius of Wordsworth

William Wordsworth was the greatest of the English Romantics, innovative in form and content, yet with a lasting influence on the conservative sensibility in culture and politics. Now he, along with Shakespeare and perhaps John Milton, belongs to the exclusive company of English poets whose names even the minimally educated are almost certain to have heard.

The New Colonialism

What may be coming our way is an odd kind of “new colonialism,” with flyover country—that Dark Continent formerly known as places like Kansas, Alabama, and Tennessee—reduced in effective power to mission territory for our enlightened coastal elites.

Philadelphia and the New “Tolerance”

A vast amount of ink has been spilled in recent years arguing for “diversity” and “tolerance” in American society. Some of these arguments are admirable and sincere. Some are cynical and vindictive. The latter applies in Philadelphia.

Until We Rest in Him

I’ve been dreading this November for the past year. In half a century of voting, I’ve been worried or frustrated by our public life many times. But 2020 has a unique toxicity, as if the whole nation were heaving, rudderless, on an ocean of poisonous blame.