Roger Scruton


Kant vs. Cant: How Liberals Lost Their Way

We belong together, liberalism tells us, because we ourselves create the law that governs us, with the aim of freeing and protecting us all. But today’s liberals identify with oppositional causes, even if — especially if — it is our tradition of liberal government that is the target.

Big Business Once Cherished Workers. Now It Exploits Them.

Victorian capitalists usually belonged to the same country, the same town and the same faith as those who worked for them, and could not escape, as their successors can, the demands of neighborhood.

Tradition, Culture, and Citizenship

The concepts of tradition, culture, and citizenship have this in common – they are summoned to protect our political inheritance against the disintegrative forces to which it is now exposed.

Universities are Reviving the Notion of Heresy

“Non-discrimination” is the orthodoxy of our day. Yet this seeming open-mindedness is just as determined to silence the heretic as any established religion.

As the Left Surges Back, Marxism’s Bloody Legacy is Covered Up

Monuments to the victims of fascism exist everywhere, but communism’s victims are hardly remembered at all.

The Tories Will Stay Lost Until They Relearn How to be Conservative

Conservatives in the U.K. could, if they chose, call upon a great tradition of social and political thinking that is far more plausible than the leftist ideology of the Momentum movement.

The Threat of Free Speech in the University

Free speech in a university is a very different thing from free speech in Congress or Parliament, freedom of the press, or free speech in the street.

The Case for Nations

The ‘we’ of the nation-state binds people together, builds an important legacy of social trust and blunts the sharp edges of globalization.

If We Are Not Just Animals, What Are We?

There is something in the human condition that suggests the need for special treatment.

The Virtue of Irrelevance

For the teacher, respect for children means giving them whatever one has by way of knowledge, teaching them to distinguish real knowledge from mere opinion, and introducing them to the subjects that make the mind adaptable to the unforeseen — even if those subjects are considered “irrelevant.”