Roger Scruton


The Fury of the Modernists

From its beginnings in the Bauhaus, architectural modernism has been less an aesthetic experiment than a moral crusade.

You Can Hate Me as Much as You Like – It’s Not a Crime

If there is hatred in our society, it does not come from ordinary prejudices, such as those that lead rival groups of citizens to treat each other with suspicion; it stems from those who do not see prejudice for what it is, the natural response to difference, and the desire to live in a comfort zone of one’s own.

VIDEO: An Interview with Roger Scruton

EPPC Senior Fellow Sir Roger Scruton appeared at the Heritage Foundation for a wide-ranging discussion of the foundations of conservatism and much more.

The Beauty of Belonging

Everyday aesthetic judgment is profoundly rooted in the sense of community, and also forms a part of the collective effort whereby communities are brought into being and maintained in equilibrium.

The Pompidou Centre, Paris’s Great Blemish

From no angle does the ostentatious Pompidou Centre fit in with its surroundings, nor did it occur to its architects that it should.

The Threat of ‘Genius’ to Truly Successful Architecture

The pursuit of genius in architecture is what has most contributed to the unstitching of our urban fabric, giving us those buildings in outlandish shapes and unsightly materials that take a chunk of the city and make it into somewhere else.

Interview: Sir Roger Scruton on What It Means to Be a Conservative

Sir Roger Scruton talks to National Review about his latest book and the meaning of conservatism.

What Trump Doesn’t Get About Conservatism

Perhaps the principal reason for doubting Mr. Trump’s conservative credentials is that being a creation of social media, he has lost the sense that there is a civilization out there that stands above his deals and his tweets in a posture of disinterested judgment.

Kant vs. Cant: How Liberals Lost Their Way

We belong together, liberalism tells us, because we ourselves create the law that governs us, with the aim of freeing and protecting us all. But today’s liberals identify with oppositional causes, even if — especially if — it is our tradition of liberal government that is the target.

Big Business Once Cherished Workers. Now It Exploits Them.

Victorian capitalists usually belonged to the same country, the same town and the same faith as those who worked for them, and could not escape, as their successors can, the demands of neighborhood.