Ethics & Public Policy Center

Josh Good Joins EPPC as New Faith Angle Forum Director

June 21, 2018


EPPC President Ed Whelan announced today that Josh Good will become the new director of EPPC’s Faith Angle Forum in July. Mr. Good succeeds EPPC Senior Fellow Peter Wehner, who added the role to his other responsibilities upon the death last summer of Faith Angle Forum founder Michael Cromartie.

“Josh Good brings an extraordinary combination of experience, ability, and vision to this position,” Mr. Whelan said, “and he’s deeply committed to the Faith Angle Forum’s mission of educating journalists about matters of faith and public life.”

Mr. Whelan also thanked Mr. Wehner for generously stepping up in the immediate wake of Mr. Cromartie’s death: “Pete has kept the Faith Angle Forum flourishing, even as he came to realize that the program requires a full-time director.”

“Josh is a very impressive person and he’ll provide excellent leadership to this unique and vital institution in American life. I’m excited for him, and for the Faith Angle Forum,” Mr. Wehner said. In addition to continuing his prolific writing as an EPPC Senior Fellow, Mr. Wehner will join the Faith Angle Forum’s advisory council.

For the past three years, Mr. Good has been program director of the Kern Family Foundation’s Faith, Work, and Economics Program, which invests heavily in pastors, evangelical seminaries, and U.S. Christian colleges. Before that, he was program manager of AEI’s Values & Capitalism Initiative for three years. He began his career in the world of public policy 20 years ago with EPPC, as assistant to then-President Elliott Abrams.

“For two decades I have watched and learned from Mike Cromartie’s grit, humor, and astonishing effectiveness,” said Mr. Good. “Mike built something of singular value at EPPC, and I am humbled to carry on his legacy.”

Read the tribute to Michael Cromartie that Josh Good wrote last August.

Like Mr. Cromartie, Mr. Good is a graduate of Covenant College. He also holds a master’s degree in Christianity and Culture from Harvard University.

Over the past two decades, the Faith Angle Forum has convened hundreds of leading journalists and scholars for in-depth conversations about faith in the public square. Participants have hailed it as having “a huge leverage point in American culture” (David Brooks, The New York Times); as “an invaluable experience” (Jeffrey Goldberg, The Atlantic); and as “one of the most pleasant as well as one of the most instructive experiences in journalism” (Adrian Wooldridge, The Economist).

Comments are closed.