Patrick T. Brown

Fellow

Patrick T. Brown is a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where his work focuses on developing a robust pro-family economic agenda and supporting families as the cornerstone of a healthy and flourishing society.

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Patrick T. Brown is a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where his work focuses on developing a robust pro-family economic agenda and supporting families as the cornerstone of a healthy and flourishing society.

His writing has been published in The New York Times, National Review, Politico, The Washington Post, and USA Today, and he has spoken on college campuses and Capitol Hill on topics from welfare reform to child care and education policy.

He has published reports on paid leave and family policy with the Institute for Family Studies, and edited an essay series featuring working-class voices for American Compass. He is an advisory board member of Humanity Forward and the Center on Child and Family Policy.

Prior to joining EPPC, Patrick served as a Senior Policy Advisor to Congress’ Joint Economic Committee (JEC). There, he helped lead research about how to make it more affordable to raise a family and more effectively invest in youth and young adults. He also previously worked a government relations staffer for Catholic Charities USA.

Patrick graduated from the University of Notre Dame with a degree in political science and economics. He also holds a Master’s in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He and his wife Jessica have three young children and live in Columbia, S.C.

 

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Can Democrats Learn from Their Faith-Based Child Care Mistakes?

Patrick T. Brown

“Build Back Better” was not a unified approach to expanding parents’ choices.

Articles

Deseret News / December 27, 2021

Was the ‘She-cession’ Narrative Overblown?

Patrick T. Brown

If lawmakers want to expand public funding of child care or other safety-net expansions, they should argue for it on its merits, not as a response to the pandemic’s impact on the labor market.

Articles

Institute for Family Studies / December 9, 2021

In A Post-Roe World, States Can Find Common Ground in Supporting Moms

Patrick T. Brown

Conservative and progressive lawmakers and activists will always disagree about whether abortion should be legal. They can find common ground, however, in making abortion less seemingly necessary for moms in economic distress.

Articles

Newsweek / December 9, 2021

Wards of the State

Patrick T. Brown

The Build Back Better child-care plan would relegate religious providers to the margins.

Articles

City Journal / December 7, 2021

Loan Giveaways Won’t Boost Family Formation

Patrick T. Brown

Policymakers can improve options for parents without forgiving student debt.

Articles

City Journal / November 18, 2021

Thoughts on a Post-Roe Agenda

Patrick T. Brown

The pressure campaigns on religious freedom and voting bills would look like child’s play if a state moved to enact restrictions potentially enabled by Dobbs. Social conservatives need to prepare a counteroffensive.

Articles

Virginia’s New Governor Should Improve Options for the Parents of Young Children

Patrick T. Brown

With D.C. consumed with a social spending bill that could dramatically reshape life for America’s families, Virginia could offer an example of authentically pro-family policy from early childhood to high school.

Articles

Institute for Family Studies / November 16, 2021

A Distinctly American Family Policy

Patrick T. Brown

Borrowing a family policy prescription from Helsinki or Budapest is bound to disappoint. A distinctly American family policy platform must be seen as expanding choice, not constraining it, and working with our national character, not trying to reshape it, all while understanding family as the essential institution in society, one that stakes an unavoidable claim on our public resources.

Articles

Public Discourse / November 11, 2021

5 Ways to Make America More Family-Friendly

Patrick T. Brown

The family is the fundamental unit of society, and has a claim on our resources. Here are five important steps policymakers could take to put that philosophy into practice.

Articles

National Catholic Register / November 10, 2021

If You Like Your Church Preschool, Can You Keep It?

Patrick T. Brown

‘Build Back Better’s’ plan for child care has an ugly blind spot when it comes to faith-based programs.

Articles

Deseret News / November 10, 2021

What the Build Back Better Act Would Mean for Families

Patrick T. Brown

Childcare subsidies would dramatically reshape the landscape for parents of young children—perhaps in ways its authors don’t intend.

Articles

The Dispatch / November 3, 2021

Examining the Relationship Between Higher Education and Family Formation

Patrick T. Brown

Proposals to reduce or eliminate student debt on a large scale are often proposed in the spirit of lifting barriers to family formation, allowing young adults to marry or become parents. But understanding what role student debt plays in the lives of young Americans is important before adopting widespread policy prescriptions.

Articles

Joint Economic Committee / November 3, 2021