Stephen P. White

Catholicism’s American Revolution

From annulments to pro-life activism, the American Church is blazing a trail for the rest of the Catholic world.

The Pope’s Climate Change Message is Really About Rethinking What it Means to be Human

What makes the new encyclical truly radical — in the sense of going to the root — is the pope’s reading of the profound human crisis that he sees underlying our modern world.

Strong Medicine: The World Needs to Hear the Message of Laudato Si’

The Pope’s forceful, and in many ways radical, critique of our modern world is not built upon a particular reading of the scientific literature, but upon the Church’s understanding of the gift of creation and the place of man within creation.

A Sign of Contradiction

To read “Laudato Si’” through the anthropologically flimsy lens of today’s policy debates—however important or urgent—is to miss the true foundations upon which Pope Francis grounds his call to defend creation.

EPPC Briefly: Yuval Levin on the Roots of a Reforming Conservatism

Mary Rice Hasson on complementarity in the church; George Weigel on Cardinal Francis George’s legacy; Bruce Cole on civics education; Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry on a surprising revolution in France; and much more.

A Life in the Public Square

Randy Boyagoda’s biography of Richard John Neuhaus is an authentic and compelling portrait of a man who had as much influence as any in the 20th century on the place of religion in American public life.

Twenty-Third Annual Tertio Millenio Seminar

Tertio Millennio Seminar on the Free Society Kraków, Poland June 30- July 17, 2014 The Tertio Millennio Seminar on the Free Society was founded in 1992 by Michael Novak, Rocco Buttiglione, Father Richard John Neuhaus, Father Maciej Zięba OP and George Weigel to deepen the dialogue on Catholic social doctrine between North American students and […]

tertio group2 2014

Our Only Option

The Catholic Church’s defense of freedom has always been a two-front war: the defense of freedom against totalitarianism was largely successful, but the defense of freedom against liberalism and relativism still hangs in the balance.

William E. Simon Lecture

World War I was a civilizational cataclysm and its effects are much among us. In his thirteenth annual William E. Simon Lecture, EPPC Distinguished Senior Fellow George Weigel explores both the perennial question of why the Great War happened and the typically unexplored, but perhaps more urgent, question of why World War I continued—and what the answers to that second question disclose about the state of western civilization today.

The Francis Revolution

Pope Francis is willing to risk raising an occasional ruckus if it means that the heart of the Church’s message gets heard.