Carter Snead

It’s Time to Defund Planned Parenthood

No amount of attacking the messenger or hair-splitting legal argument can change the fact that Planned Parenthood’s own medical directors have unwittingly offered rare and much-needed clarity about the nature of the business that Planned Parenthood has chosen, and shared (if inadvertently) the truth about precisely whose lives are destroyed as a result.

Video: “Fetal Pain, the Moral Imagination, and Our Common Humanity”

EPPC Fellow Carter Snead, Notre Dame law professor and director of the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture, spoke at the opening of the 2014 National Right to Life Convention. Click below to watch a video of his remarks.    

Once More Unto the Breach

Consistent with its ruling in favor of the federal partial-birth abortion law, the Supreme Court should rule that an Oklahoma law that prohibits the non-FDA-approved use of abortion-inducing drugs is valid.

The Constitutionality of Protecting Unborn Babies at 20 Weeks

State legislation that would generally prohibit abortion of unborn babies who are capable of experiencing pain is constitutionally permissible.

Planned Parenthood’s Hostages

Breast-cancer victims are only the latest hostages taken by Planned Parenthood. Unless the organization is finally held to account, they will surely not be the last.

EPPC Bioethics Expert Appointed as U.S. Permanent Observer

EPPC Fellow Carter Snead was appointed to serve as U.S. Permanent Observer for the Council of Europe’s Bioethics Steering Committee (CDBI).

Carter Snead, Expert on Law and Bioethics, Joins EPPC

The Ethics and Public Policy Center is delighted to announce that Carter Snead, an internationally recognized expert in the field of law and bioethics, has affiliated with EPPC as a Fellow. His specific areas of expertise include stem-cell research, human cloning, assisted reproduction, neuroscience, abortion, end-of-life matters, and research involving human subjects.

Technology and the Constitution

How does technological progress affect the way judges interpret the law? This question is especially significant for those who believe the Constitution should be construed according to its original meaning. O. Carter Snead examines three different crises that technology creates for judicial interpretation—crises of application, crises of premises, and crises of meaning. (Click here to […]